[root@labadclient02 open1x]# vim md5.conf
# This is an example configuration file for xsupplicant versions after 0.8b.

### GLOBAL SECTION

# network_list: defines all of the networks in this file which
#      should be kept in memory and used.Comma delimited list or "all"
#      for keeping all defined configurations in memory. For efficiency,
#      keep only the networks you might roam to in memory.
#      To avoid errors, make sure your default network is always
#      in the network_list.  In general, you will want to leave this set to
#      "all".

network_list = all
#network_list = default, test1, test2

# default_netname: some users may actually have a network named "default".
#      since "default" is a keyword in the network section below, you can
#      change which is to be used as the replacement for this keyword

default_netname = default
#default_netname = my_defaults

# In the startup_command, first_auth_command, and reauth_command you can
# use "%i" to have xsupplicant fill in the interface that is being used.
# This allows a single network profile to work across different wireless
# cards.

# startup_command: the command to run when xsupplicant is first started.
#   this command can do things such as configure the card to associate with
#   the network properly.
startup_command = <BEGIN_COMMAND>/etc/open1x/bin/startup.sh<END_COMMAND>

# first_auth_command: the command to run when xsupplicant authenticates to
#   a wireless network for the first time.  This will usually be used to
#   start a DHCP client process.
first_auth_command = <BEGIN_COMMAND>/etc/open1x/bin/startup2.sh<END_COMMAND>

# reauth_command: the command to run when xsupplicant reauthenticates to a
#   wireless network.  This may be used to have the dhcp client rerequest
#   it's IP address.
reauth_command = <BEGIN_COMMAND>echo "authenticated user %i"<END_COMMAND>

# When running in daemon, or non-foreground mode, you may want to have the
# output of the program.  So, define a log file here.  Each time XSupplicant
# is started, this file will be replaced.  So, there is no need to roll the
# log file.
logfile = /var/log/xsupplicant.log

# The auth_period, held_period, and max_starts modify the timers in the state
# machine.  (Please reference the 802.1x spec for info on how they are used.)
# For most people, there is no reason to define these values, as the defaults
# should work.

#auth_period = 30

#held_period = 30

#max_starts = 3

# Defining an interface in "allow_interfaces" will bypass the rules that
# xsupplicant uses to determine if an interface is valid.  For most people
# this setting shouldn't be needed.  It is useful for having xsupplicant
# attempt to authenticate on interfaces that don't appear to be true
# physical interfaces.  (i.e. Virtual interfaces such as eth0:1)

allow_interfaces = eth0

# Defining an interface in "deny_interfaces" will prevent xsupplicant from
# attempting to authenticate on a given interface.  This is useful if you
# know that you will never do 802.1x on a specific interface.  However,
# allows will take priority over denies, so defining the same interface in
# the allow_interfaces, and deny_interfaces will result in the interface
# being used.

deny_interfaces = eth1

###  NETWORK SECTION



# The general format of the network section is a network name followed
# by a group of variables.

# Network names may contain the following characters: a-z, A-Z, 0-9, '-',
# '_', '\', '/'
# Those interested in having an SSID with ANY character in it can use
# the ssid tag within the network clause. Otherwise, your ssid will
# be the name of the network.

## The default network is not a network itself. These values are
## the default used for any network parameters not overridden
## in another section. If it's not in your network configuration
## and not in your default, it won't work!!

default
{
  # type: the type of this network. wired or wireless, if this value is not
  # set, xsupplicant will attempt to determine if the interface is wired or
  # wireless.  In general, you should only need to define this when
  # xsupplicant incorrectly identifies your network interface.
  #type = wireless

  # wireless_control: If this profile is forced to wired, this will not do
  # anything.  However, if the interface is forced, or detected to be wireless
  # XSupplicant will take control of re/setting WEP keys when the machine
  # first starts, and when it jumps to a different AP.  In general, you won't
  # need to define, or set this value.
  # wireless_control = yes

  # allow_types:  describes which EAP types this network will allow.  The
  # first type listed will be requested if the server tries to use something
  # not in this list.
  # allow_types = eap_tls, eap_md5, eap_gtc, eap-otp
  allow_types = all

  # identity:  what to respond with when presented with an EAP Id Request
  #   Typically, this is the username for this network. Since this can
  #   be an arbitrary string, enclose within <BEGIN_ID> and <END_ID>
  #identity = <BEGIN_ID>testing1<END_ID>
  identity = <BEGIN_ID>m1k3<END_ID>

  # Force xsupplicant to send it's packets to this destination MAC address.
  # In most cases, this isn't needed, and shouldn't be defined.
  #dest_mac = 00:aA:bB:cC:dD:eE

  eap-md5 {
      username = <BEGIN_UNAME>m1k3<END_UNAME>
      password = <BEGIN_PASS>m1k3<END_PASS>
  }
}
 
md5conf01.txt · Last modified: 2009/09/13 17:39 (external edit)
 
Except where otherwise noted, content on this wiki is licensed under the following license:CC Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 Unported
Recent changes RSS feed Donate Powered by PHP Valid XHTML 1.0 Valid CSS Driven by DokuWiki